The Case for Diverse Leadership

The Case for Diverse Leadership

One of the most powerful women on Wall Street makes a compelling case for gender diversity.  In this Knowledge at Wharton conversation, Sallie Krawcheck offers frank and humorous advice on how to negotiate and network your way to the top.  The former head of Smith Barney and Merrill Lynch is the owner and chair of Elevate Network a network dedicated to the economic engagement of women worldwide.

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The Business Case for Diverse Leadership

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The Best Career Advice You Never Got

The Best Career Advice You Never Got

The CEO of Leading Women answers the question:  “Why am I getting passed over?” Susan Colantuono discusses a leadership trait that you and many women may be missing.  To close the gender gap at the top, Susan’s research shows women need to beef up their business, strategic, and financial acumen.  It’s key for women to be able to articulate that they understand where their organization is headed and that they fit into the strategy to get there.  Your ability to speak clearly about strategy will help you rise in the ranks.

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Susan Colantuono: The career advice you probably didn’t get

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Impassioned Plea for Women’s Rights

Impassioned Plea for Women’s Rights

“We must change attitudes around the world.”

Watch Angelina Jolie Pitt at the Women in the World Summit deliver an impassioned plea for women in war torn regions.  Angelina pledges her personal support to the women and girls in Iraq and Syria facing horrifying violence.   And, calls on the world powers to step up saying crimes against women can no longer be secondary issues.

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Lesson from the Oscars

Make Your 15 Seconds Count

Academy Award acceptance speeches have long been used by Hollywood stars to raise awareness of favored causes.  The much-deserving top actress honorees both seized the opportunity before a worldwide audience.   A comparison of the performances of Julianne Moore and Patricia Arquette reveals a sharp contrast in technique.


patricia_arquetteBest supporting actress Patricia Arquette’s passion was palpable but her prose was problematic.  The shout out for women’s equal rights garnered a fist pump from Meryl Streep and wild applause from the glittering crowd.  But, her call to action would have been more effective if she hadn’t been so rushed and jumbled.  See the video clip.

The 60 seconds before the cut off music played should have been enough time to say something but it wasn’t enough to say everything.  Arquette hurriedly thanked colleagues and loved ones.  The list of names on crumpled paper was followed by a plug for an organization that provides ecological sanitation in the developing world. Only then with the clock running out did she call for wage equality and equal rights for women.

The gender empowerment refrain may have appeared to be an afterthought if you hadn’t seen “Boyhood” the film Arquette was nominated for.  She played a divorced mom who was raising two children while trying to pay the bills and put herself through college.  A struggle faced by many real-life parents.


julienne_mooreJulianne Moore’s turn in the spotlight was the performance of someone who has arrived.  While slightly out of breath and with her eyes shining, Moore’s remarks were heartfelt and focused.  With poise she acknowledged her sister nominees and remembered the names of the people she thanked.

The greater part of her brief stage time was used to praise the filmmakers of “Still Alice” for their depiction of a middle-aged wife and mother who realizes she has Alzheimer’s.   Moore said the movie shines a light on the isolation and marginalization of people suffering from the disease. See the video clip.

Moore was able to articulate why so many of us love the movies.  The best films address the everyday struggles, hopes, and fears of ticket buyers.  In 2014, Hollywood brought the themes of crippling disease, racism, and sexuality identity to the big screen.  Moore spoke to the power of the movies to help us feel seen and connected.

 

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Public Speaking Resolutions For a Well-Spoken Year!

Public Speaking Resolutions For a Well-Spoken Year!

1. Ring in 2015 with a toast. It’s good practice.

2. Create your elevator speech. In 2 minutes, what do you care about & why does it matter?

3. Quote the greats: “The American dream is not dead. It is gasping for breath but it is not dead.” Barbara Jordan

4. Warm up beforehand. Slowly roll your shoulders back to release tension.

5. Use purposeful pauses. A moment of silence gives the listeners a chance to absorb the meaning.

6. Avoid repeating useless words: “Like, so, anyway, actually, and absolutely.”

7. Heed Ann Richards: “I spent hours of time rehearsing… It had to sound casual, conversational, but that took work.”

8. Don’t sweat the small stuff like a mispronounced word. It is possible to make a mistake and still do well.

9. Project your best self. As Lena Dunham says: “Enjoy going through life as yourself.”

10. Give yourself a high five when you deliver a winning performance.

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Pockets are a Girl’s Best Friend

Pockets are a Girl’s Best Friend

Next time you’re shopping, be on the look out for a blazer with pockets.  Pockets can be lifesavers when you are standing at the front of the room.  No, I don’t mean you should cram your hands into them.  Rather, they can help ensure you’ll be ready when it’s your turn to talk.

Pockets can hold helpful tools.  Note cards in the 3×5 size will fit.  You can easily pull them out should you need a prompt.  Having a tissue handy is a must if you are suffering from a cold.  And, a throat lozenge will ease a scratchy throat or cotton mouth.  If you use a remote, you won’t have to hold it the entire time you’re talking.

As far as hands in the pockets – one hand is poised but two hands is a no-no.  It will look sloppy and if you’re nervous you will likely clench your into fists.

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